Techno Music Melbourne

D-REX is a heavy metal fan. Growing up listening to hardcore and metal, he is able to burgeon these into his releases today. Once you understand where D-REX has come from, it’s easy to see how he has produced Serpent29. As a self-released EP, Serpent29 features heavy distortion borrowed from these genres, and fat basslines. To put simply; it’s big.

“Saturnine” is an eerie beginning to the EP, creeping in with a thunderous growling that remains a prevalent feature throughout. This sequence is the core of the track, with elements forming around it; like the low, hollow, tinny sound that is introduced at the minute-mark, and high-hats and light rattle that are brought in and out of the mix. As the EP’s longest track, “Saturine” makes use of the time to draw out and explore each element to its full capacity.

Following with “Serpent29,” D-REX employs a distortive bounce and builds up to moment that the throbbing bass drops. The textures of the title-track feel fuzzy, while his influences in metal music are highly evident, with the trilling buzz and all-consuming bassline ringing loud.

“Vehemence” fades in with the whirling, helicopter-like sound. Sudden stop-starts feature heavily in this track, with D-REX using it as a way to work from the high and low level melodies, to the striped back, bass-heavy kicks. As the EPs closer, “Vehemence” is made to be enjoyed with headphones on to enable listeners to hear the various layers.

What makes this release even more exceptional, is that D-REX is responsible for every element of this release; from writing to producing, to mastering and creating the artwork.

Serpent29 is out now.

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